@artists and manippers who put tattoos on your characters

mayalaen:

Please turn the opacity of the tattoo layer down just a little – even 95% will help it look more real.

Tattoos don’t stay on top of the skin. The ink is pushed via needles through the epidermis (outer layers) and into the dermis layers (on top of the subcutaneous layers), and once it heals, what you’re actually seeing is the tattoo THROUGH the epidermis layers of skin.

That’s why tattoos, once they’re healed, don’t look like they’re painted on the skin, and if you’re creating art or doing a manip where your character’s tattoos are 100% opacity, they won’t look real.

Tattoo artists also take advantage of a client’s skin tone, so if the client’s skin is a color close to what they need in any given area, they leave it open to “breathe” without any ink. Using this in your art and manips will make tattoos appear more realistic too.

If you’re creating an elderly character with old tattoos, don’t blend the colors as much, don’t use white (white has only worked well in the last 10-15 years after new formulas were created), turn the opacity down even more, and use a little bit of blur on the tattoo layer. Don’t forget that skin wrinkles as a person ages, and the tattooed areas are no exception to this.

If the tattoo is more than 60 years old, ONLY USE RED, BLACK, AND MUSTARD-ISH YELLOW. If you need references for the shades of red and yellow, look up “American Traditional tattoos” and “traditional Polynesian tattoos” and “traditional Japanese tattoos” in Google Image Search.

@artists and manippers who put tattoos on your characters

Please turn the opacity of the tattoo layer down just a little – even 95% will help it look more real.

Tattoos don’t stay on top of the skin. The ink is pushed via needles through the epidermis (outer layers) and into the dermis layers (on top of the subcutaneous layers), and once it heals, what you’re actually seeing is the tattoo THROUGH the epidermis layers of skin.

That’s why tattoos, once they’re healed, don’t look like they’re painted on the skin, and if you’re creating art or doing a manip where your character’s tattoos are 100% opacity, they won’t look real.

Tattoo artists also take advantage of a client’s skin tone, so if the client’s skin is a color close to what they need in any given area, they leave it open to “breathe” without any ink. Using this in your art and manips will make tattoos appear more realistic too.

If you’re creating an elderly character with old tattoos, don’t blend the colors as much, don’t use white (white has only worked well in the last 10-15 years after new formulas were created), turn the opacity down even more, and use a little bit of blur on the tattoo layer. Don’t forget that skin wrinkles as a person ages, and the tattooed areas are no exception to this.

If the tattoo is more than 60 years old, ONLY USE RED, BLACK, AND MUSTARD-ISH YELLOW. If you need references for the shades of red and yellow, look up “American Traditional tattoos” and “traditional Polynesian tattoos” and “traditional Japanese tattoos” in Google Image Search.